Transfer Learning Using Ensemble Neural Networks for Organic Solar Cell Screening

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Authors Arindam Paul, Dipendra Jha, Alok Choudhary, Wei-keng Liao, Reda Al-Bahrani, Ankit Agrawal
Journal/Conference Name Proceedings of the International Joint Conference on Neural Networks
Paper Category
Paper Abstract Organic Solar Cells are a promising technology for solving the clean energy crisis in the world. However, generating candidate chemical compounds for solar cells is a time-consuming process requiring thousands of hours of laboratory analysis. For a solar cell, the most important property is the power conversion efficiency which is dependent on the highest occupied molecular orbitals (HOMO) values of the donor molecules. Recently, machine learning techniques have proved to be very useful in building predictive models for HOMO values of donor structures of Organic Photovoltaic Cells (OPVs). Since experimental datasets are limited in size, current machine learning models are trained on data derived from calculations based on density functional theory (DFT). Molecular line notations such as SMILES or InChI are popular input representations for describing the molecular structure of donor molecules. The two types of line representations encode different information, such as SMILES defines the bond types while InChi defines protonation. In this work, we present an ensemble deep neural network architecture, called SINet, which harnesses both the SMILES and InChI molecular representations to predict HOMO values and leverage the potential of transfer learning from a sizeable DFT-computed dataset- Harvard CEP to build more robust predictive models for relatively smaller HOPV datasets. Harvard CEP dataset contains molecular structures and properties for 2.3 million candidate donor structures for OPV while HOPV contains DFT-computed and experimental values of 350 and 243 molecules respectively. Our results demonstrate significant performance improvement from the use of transfer learning and leveraging both molecular representations.
Date of publication 2019
Code Programming Language Jupyter Notebook
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